Friday, 30 September 2016

Charity Regulator Meeting Cork

DESCRIPTION

Fundraising and Financial Reporting are topical matters in the charitable sector at present.  People want to know where their money is going and how it is accounted for in an organisation's annual returns.  
With that in mind the Charities Regulator is currently reviewing both of these areas and we want to hear your views.
We are hosting a series of meetings, to consult with external stakeholders, on the development of new Accountancy Regulations as well as Fundraising Guidelines.
Our third meeting will take place in Cork on the 11th of October 2016.
The evening will consist of two presentations, commencing at 7.30pm, with a Q + A session to follow.
Location: 'Alexandra Suite'
DATE AND TIME

Monday, 26 September 2016

Good news from Muintir na Tire / Community Alert.


As you well know, the growth of text alert networks throughout Ireland has proven to be an outstanding crime prevention initiative, which was originally developed from a Muintir na Tire / Community Alert pilot scheme in Co Kerry eight years ago and then throughout, Co Cork and Limerick.
After serious discussion during the past year the Department of Justice has recognised the effort made by local groups who operate text alert networks.
Local networks allow instant communication to their members from the Gardaí, but at a high cost to their members in voluntary work effort and the money that pays for text messages received.
These text messages update people on potential threats to themselves and their neighbours, and thwart the ability of criminals to criss-cross the countryside unnoticed.
People respond to the Gardai with updates where they have seen sightings of suspects and enable rapid interception.
There has been many discussions at Community Alert meetings, about why the local networks should bear the brunt of these costs, especially when the message is of dubious value to a particular locality.
Consequently, to the questions discussed, the message and the feelings of members has been raised at Community Alert management meeting’s in Dublin.
While we recognise the many shortcomings that still exist, and which we are striving to solve – the financial rebate is a measure of the appreciation that you and your members in your local group, well deserve.
Please go-online if possible and claim your rebate or further details are available here.

 
We are now launching another game changing initiative, to capitalise on the success of alerts.

It is a long term project to inform people about the importance of methodically noting identification serial numbers of smaller equipment such as lawn mowers, laptops, phones and drills, chainsaws etc. so that they can be reclaimed if recovered by the Gardai. 
The Muintir na Tire / Community Alert, Property Log book, is a property identification recording booklet, and its available in bulk to local Community organisations of any type to promote as a local crime prevention initiative, and to use as a local fundraiser.

The success of local people to deter crime is entirely due to the key factors of making an effort together, encouraging each other, doing the small actions.
Having details of Make – Model, and Serial number is an elementary aspect of home and farm security, elementary but neglected – until now.
These essential details are the steps to recovery, restoration, successful prosecutions, and deterrence.
However the message will have to be frequently asked, “Have YOU filled in your Property Log book?”
People are lackadaisical about such things, “It will never happen to me, sure what have I got to steal”
When a theft occurs it’s a different matter, the anger of the victim, the anger at being unprepared - caught so to speak with ones pants down,  the painful financial cost to replace, some sentimental things cannot be replaced.
That’s why Community Alert have published 10,000 copies of this booklet, and it has been reprinted already due to uptake.
Its available in bulk to any community group who need a fundraiser or who wish to promote the crime prevention initiative.
Criminals will soon become wary of the danger of handling identifiable stolen property.
So side by side with this we are promoting the truth “An item with its serial number removed has been stolen from someone” “It’s TOO HOT to HANDLE”.
I hope that you will join us in helping to promote the use of the Property Log Book.
I have attached an order form, and I will have bundles of the book at our CA District meetings.
For More details Contact Diarmuid Cronin communityalert2@eircom.net

Lettuce News From GIY Ireland

Veg Of The Week - Lettuce

Quick to grow, healthy to eat, a versatile ingredient and not associated with unpleasant bodily functions, what's not to love?

Last week’s veg (Jerusalem artichokes) provoked much hilarity so we’re back on safer ground this week with lettuce.  Beyond the bog-standard butterhead and iceberg, it’s difficult to find really great quality, fresh organic lettuce of different varieties in the supermarket. 
Lettuce is really easy to grow and relatively quick (about 10-12 weeks from sowing to eating) and with a little planning, you can eat it fresh for most of the year.  It’s still not too late to sow lettuce as long as you pick the right winter-hardy varieties and provide some cover (e.g. fleece) in very frosty weather. In fact it’s generally a lot easier growing lettuce in the colder autumn weather, with improved germination and better growth.
Sowing
There are four main types of lettuce.  The first three - butterheads, cos and crispheads - form hearts at their centre and are therefore usually grown as proper heads of lettuce.  They take longer to mature.  The fourth type - loose-leaf - doesn’t form a heart and is therefore generally grown as a “cut-and-come-again” crop – where leaves are cut as required.
Though you can sow lettuce direct in the soil, I always start my seeds off in module trays in the potting shed and plant them out later – it’s far more reliable that way.  Spring and autumn sowings I plant out in the polytunnel, while the summer sowings are generally planted outside in the veg patch. If you are growing heads of lettuce, sow just one seed in each module.  With loose leaf types, sow 3-5 seeds per module. Lettuce needs light to germinate so don’t cover the seeds with compost (or if you do, just a very gentle sprinkle).  Lettuce will not germinate in temperatures above 25 degrees celsius so if the weather is warm you may need to move the trays in to a cool shed for a few days until they germinate.
Succession sowing is the way to go.  The first time I tried growing lettuce, I sowed a full module tray of 82 seeds, which meant I had 82 heads of lettuce all ready at the same time.  Great if you’re catering for a wedding, but not so great otherwise.  So the key here is to sow ‘little but often’.  I generally sow trays of lettuce every 2-3 weeks from January until October.  The last sowing is designed to see me right through the winter months until the new season leaves are ready in March.
Seedlings are ready to plant out when they have 4 or 5 leaves, usually about 4-5 weeks after sowing.  In colder weather, harden off well before planting out (in other words, get them used to the colder temperatures outside by bringing them in again at night time for a few days). 
Growing
Lettuce will do well in any reasonable soil, as long as it’s moisture retentive – add well-rotted manure or compost the previous winter.  Lettuce is a great space filler – you can pop it anywhere you have some space.  Spacing is about 20-30cm depending on the type.  Plant the seedlings well down in the soil with the cotyledons (seed leaves) just above the soil level.  Keep the soil around the plants weed free and water copiously in dry weather – this will help prevent them bolting.  Use fleece or cloches to protect early and late sowings from frost.
Harvesting
Cos, Butterhead and Crisphead varieties of lettuce need to be left longer to develop their hearts.  Cut leaves of loose-leaf varieties as soon aa they are of usable size.  If you cut them about 5cm from the ground they will grow back and you will be able to take a second crop in a few weeks.  Harvest lettuce leaves early in the day and they will keep far longer.  This is because later in the day the moisture has evaporated from the leaves and so it wilts more quickly.
Recommended Varieties
Mixed Leaf, Dynamite, Little Gem, Brandon, Iceberg, Aruba
Problems
Lack of water causes the plants to panic and run to seed in a desperate attempt to reproduce before they die.  This is called “bolting” and it’s very bad news as the plants are too bitter to eat.  Slugs eat young leaves and get in to the hearts of lettuces.  Aphids (black or greenfly) can be a problem.  Leatherjackets (the larvae of the Daddy Longlegs) eat through the stems of newly planted lettuce.
GIY Tips
  • To wash, fill your sink with really cold water and break up the heads of lettuce in to the water.  Let it all float in the water for 5 minutes or so.  All the grit and dirt (and occasional slugs) will sink to the bottom of the sink and you can then scoop out the clean lettuce.  Dry in a lettuce spinner and put in a plastic container with a lid in the fridge – it should keep for 3-4 days.
  • Try growing summer lettuce in partial shade – they don’t like hot weather.

Seán O'Sé and LIam O'hUigin To be honoured this Friday in Cork City Hall



8th Annual Celebrating Cork Past Exhibition
Cork City Millennium Hall/Lecture Hall, City Hall, Cork. Friday September 30th 2016. 10:00 – 18:30.

For this year, Mr. Seán O'Sé will be awarded the Lord Mayor's Community Heritage award in grateful appreciation for his immense contribution to the cultural life in Cork.
Mr. Liam O'hUigin will be awarded the Cork Local Historian of the year award.

Seán Ó Sé






Seán Ó Sé is a native of Bantry, Co. Cork, where he was born into an Irish speaking family immersed in traditional music and song. He studied singing under the late John T. Horne at The Cork School of Music. Seán had a long association with Seán Ó Riada, which began with their recording of An Poc ar Buile for Gael-Linn. He sang with Ó Riada on several radio and television programmes, most notably Fleadh Cheoil an Radio. He is featured on many of Ó Riada’s recordings including Ó Riada sa Gaiety and the film music of Rhapsody of a River and Kennedy’s Ireland.
Since Ó Riada’s death Seán has recorded with Donal Lunny, Dermot O’Brien and Peadar O’ Riada He has also featured on a number of Comhaltas Echoes of Erin CDs.
In recent years he has toured in Moscow, Shanghai and Havana with Comhaltas. In July he will go to The Catskills north of NY for their famous Irish Festival and he has recently returned form visits to Milan and Cape Breton.


Liam O’hUigin

“My name is Liam O’hUigin (William Higgins) and I was born in Henry Street in the Middle Parish (Hammond’s Marsh) 1941. I was baptised and celebrated my First Holy Communion and Confirmation in St. Peter and Pauls Church, Cork City.
I attended St. Josephs School on the Mardyke 1945-1954. I left school at 14 years of age with my Primary Cert and became a Messenger Boy in Musgraves in Cornmarket Street.
My mother who was born in Vicar Street, off Barrack Street died when I was a young lad so I spent a lot of my youth with my Grandmother and Aunt in that part of the City. Therefore, I grew up in the two most historical parts of Cork City: the Middle Parish and the South Parish.
As I got older I took a profound interest in the street names and laneways in Barrack Street and in the North Main Street areas. And as the saying goes you never forget the neighbourhood or the children you grew up with.
Looking back, when I think of all the wonderful times I had in the Marsh area particularly the Mardyke and the Lee Fields we spent so many glorious days there swimming, fishing, playing football, hurling and cricket and the fun we had in Piper’s Merries and Fitzgerald’s Park, and as we got a bit older, courting.
When I think back to those wonderful childhood days we had a charmed life; we made our own enjoyment, no Facebook, Twitter or Iphones in those days.
When I hear the song “The Banks of My old Lovely Lee” I get very emotional as it brings back so many memories.
As I got older the love and passion for the Heritage, Culture and Tradition of my dear City of Cork grew more and more as if the blood in my body became part of the River Lee. It was only then that I realised that I grew up in a City that had the most beautiful people in this world.
I went back to school in Coláiste Stiofáin Naofa to further my education when I was in my late fifties and there I was introduced to computers – what a change.
I got involved in the Cork South Parish Historical Society of which I am now the P.R.O., and I am a Committee Member of the Ballyphehane Commemoration 1916 Group.
I now give lectures and power point presentations to schools, ladies and gents retirement groups, Day Centres, nursing homes, sports clubs and anyone who is interested.
I also do walking tours and speak about the rich colourful history of our beautiful City of Cork.
I would now like to thank a few people who are helping me in this new phase of my life.
My wife Joan who must be a saint at this stage for putting up with me, my two daughters, and my two sons, who are so helpful to me with my computer problems.
My friends in Ballyphehane, Togher, C.D.P., Kieran McCarthy, Ronnie Herlihy, and Pat Kelly who knows more about world history than anyone I know.
But most of all I want to thank Richard T. Cooke for all the help and encouragement he has given me down through the years.”

Wild Atlantic Words Poetry Festival


30 September to 2 October 2016
Castletownbere, County Cork

Friday 30 September
8.00pm, whiteRoom  Poetry Friday Open mic – all are invited to come along and read or listen. 

Saturday 1 October
10.30am – 12.30pm, whiteRoom  Poetry workshop   Poetry of Place: ‘This is the quickest way through’.  Led by Annette Skade.  There is a fee of €20, and places are limited.  Please pre-book (for contact details see below).

2pm, Beara Coast Hotel   The Seamus Heaney lecture byBernard O’Donoghue

6pm, Sarah Walker Gallery  Wild Atlantic Words  Readings and awards from the Wild Atlantic Words poetry competition 2016, and launch of the anthology

Sunday 2 October
10.30am, whiteRoom  Poetry workshop  A writing Life.  Led by Jennifer Russell.  There is a fee of €20, and places are limited.  Please pre-book (for contact details see below).
2pm, whiteRoom   The Spoken Word Competition   Recite or read your own or another poet’s poem (admission free, competitors €2 per poem).  Prizes will be awarded for performance.

4pm, whiteRoom  Poetry Readings  by Maxine Backus and John Baylis Post


Except where specified, admission to all events is free.

To book workshops or for further information, contact
Jennifer on 0(0353)851512652 or John on 0(0353)838637536

Saturday, 24 September 2016

Craft Classes Cluain Dara Day Care Centre Fermoy starting Oct 3rd

Craft Classes

Knitting, crochet, embroidery, canvas work and Lace Making


Venue:

Cluain Dara Day Care Centre Fermoy


Starting:

03/10/2016


Time:

7.30pm-9.30pm


Contact Details

Mary 025/32532

Friday, 23 September 2016

CELEBRATING CORK PAST HERITAGE EXHIBITiON – SEPT. 30th 2016



For a number of years now a most wonderful event takes place in the City Hall each year, entitled the "Celebrating Cork Past Exhibition". It is a day for the County's hard-working Heritage and Historical Societies to highlight and showcase the heritage they preserve and protect locally to other like-minded groups and indeed to the hundreds of visitors who attend on the day. This year the exhibition will take place on Friday, 30th September, 2016, and all of the City and County Heritage Groups are invited to participate on the day. The theme for this year's exhibition is 1916 commemoration and please see the attached document for more information.



Celebrating Cork Past Exhibition 2016

8th Annual Family Heritage Festival
Celebrating Cork Past Exhibition 2016

Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork City, Ireland.
Friday, September 30th, 2016
10.00am-18.30pm
Officially launched by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Cllr. Des Cahill & County Mayor, Cllr. Seamus McGrathat 12noon – all are welcome
Admission: Free

SPIKE ISLAND TO FEATURE ON RTÉ’S BUILDING IRELAND SERIES – SEPT. 30th 2016



"RTÉ TV series BUILDING IRELAND returns for a second series with a fantastic new range of subjects to celebrate Ireland's engineering and architectural heritage. Our launch episode in this exciting six-part series puts a spotlight on the amazing story of Fortress Spike Island! Our expert presenters, an engineer, an architect, and a geographer, celebrate the history and heritage of Spike Island and the town of Cobh. They provide in-depth insights into the construction of the fortress, its conversion into the largest prison in the British Isles, and its relationship with the town of Cobh. Featuring spectacular aerial photography, interviews with specialist historians, and never-before seen archival materials, episode one of BUILDING IRELAND, entitled "FORTRESS SPIKE ISLAND" shows the impact this unique piece of built heritage has had on the region of Cork". The Spike Island episode will air on RTÉ One at 20:30 on Friday the 30th of September. It will feature interviews with a number of Cork County Council personnel including Cal McCarthy, Mona Hallinan and Tom O' Neill. Be sure not to miss it 

For More Information Click Here

Text Alert Rebate Scheme

Muintir na Tíre are happy to announce the launch of a new Text Alert Rebate Scheme on the last day of the 2016 Ploughing Championships.

Speaking as she visited the National Ploughing Championships today, Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald announced that the funding for the Community Alert programme  now incorporates a new €100,000 rebate scheme for local groups registered under the Text Alert Scheme. This follows intensive lobbying from Muintir na Tíre to recognise the exceptional work carried out by local groups to support the Gardaí in their crime prevention efforts. It provides recognition of the costs which these communities pay themselves to reduce crime in their areas.
Each eligible group will receive a rebate of at least €100 towards allowable costs. Muintir na Tíre will administer the scheme and further details are available here.

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Café Conversations on Death and Dying

Greetings from SHEP.

The Irish Hospice Foundation has organised a series of Café Conversations on Death and Dying around Ireland.  They wish to encourage open conversations about death and also wish to prepare a submission to the government – a National Charter - in relation to people’s needs around death and dying. The organising group has asked SHEP to help publicise the Cork Café  Conversation and to encourage people to attend.  It will take place in the Wilton SMA Community Hall, next to Wilton Church and Shopping Centre on Thursday of next week – i.e. Thursday 29th September from 11.00 to 1.00.  Refreshments will be served.  All are welcome.  Please pass on the word to others in your circle.

Further details can be found below, along with a link to their online survey.

 

Many thanks –

Mary Mangan

 

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Mary Mangan

The Social and Health Education Project

Village Centre, Station Road, Ballincollig, Co. Cork.

(021) 4666180

www.socialandhealth.com

P Before printing, think about the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Some meaningful interactions you can do to engage with this campaign in the coming weeks:

 

1.     Get involved with the#haveyoursayirl social media campaign inviting people to talk about dying, death and bereavement and complete www.surveymonkey.com/r/haveyoursayirl

Watch out for Have Your Say on twitter/IrishHospice and facebook/IrishHospiceFoundation – campaign kicked off this week and will build over the coming weeks.

2.     Engage with NGOs and the health sector in your circle of contacts to ensure their input is part of the Charter through email, social media and survey. Please feel free to forward on this email to your contacts.

3.     Display the attached charter poster and survey leaflet (hard copies available from IHF) 

4.     Attending or asking your contacts to attend Death Café Conversations to further engage with the public:

 

a.     Café Conversation Cork: Thursday September 29th11.00am – 1.00pm SMA Hall, Wilton 

 

 

We partnered with Limerick Compassionate Communities (part of Milford Hospice) whose experience was instrumental in this. We’ll also be active as part of Palliative care week/ International hospice day with AIIHPC.

 

If you have any feedback on this campaign, please contact us – we would love to hear your views. 

 

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This email has been scanned for spam and malware by The Email Laundry.

 

pen conversations about death and also wish to prepare a submission to the government – a National Charter - in relation to people’s needs around death and dying. The organising group has asked SHEP to help publicise the Cork Café  Conversation and to encourage people to attend.  It will take place in the Wilton SMA Community Hall, next to Wilton Church and Shopping Centre on Thursday of next week – i.e. Thursday 29th September from 11.00 to 1.00.  Refreshments will be served.  All are welcome.  Please pass on the word to others in your circle.

Further details can be found below, along with a link to their online survey.

 

Many thanks –

Mary Mangan

 

Description: shep-40

Mary Mangan

The Social and Health Education Project

Village Centre, Station Road, Ballincollig, Co. Cork.

(021) 4666180

www.socialandhealth.com

P Before printing, think about the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

cid:image001.png@01D201E3.04127C50

 

Some meaningful interactions you can do to engage with this campaign in the coming weeks:

 

1.     Get involved with the#haveyoursayirl social media campaign inviting people to talk about dying, death and bereavement and complete www.surveymonkey.com/r/haveyoursayirl

Watch out for Have Your Say on twitter/IrishHospice and facebook/IrishHospiceFoundation – campaign kicked off this week and will build over the coming weeks.

2.     Engage with NGOs and the health sector in your circle of contacts to ensure their input is part of the Charter through email, social media and survey. Please feel free to forward on this email to your contacts.

3.     Display the attached charter poster and survey leaflet (hard copies available from IHF) 

4.     Attending or asking your contacts to attend Death Café Conversations to further engage with the public:

 

a.     Café Conversation Cork: Thursday September 29th11.00am – 1.00pm SMA Hall, Wilton 

 

 

We partnered with Limerick Compassionate Communities (part of Milford Hospice) whose experience was instrumental in this. We’ll also be active as part of Palliative care week/ International hospice day with AIIHPC.

 

If you have any feedback on this campaign, please contact us – we would love to hear your views. 

 

cid:image015.png@01D201E3.04127C50

 

 

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This email has been scanned for spam and malware by The Email Laundry.

 

Social Alarms Seniors Alert Scheme


To all in Muintir Cork  

Hope you are keeping well. If you know of somebody who needs a social alarm or who has an alarm over ten years and needs a replacement they can get a grant under the seniors alert scheme . Click on link below.

Please see the Social Alarm and Pendant we are now supplying under the Senior Alert Scheme since sept 2015 .



Kind Regards
Peter Butler
TASK Community Care
0860568155.

Click on

www.acaringcommunity.org/287401539


Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Bereavement Information Evening Westlodge Hotel, Bantry Tue 27th of September 19:30


Anam Cara supports 1,800 bereaved parents every year, yet we know there are many parents out there at a local level who are not aware of the service.

If you are in contact with any bereaved parents, please consider passing the below information on to them:

Anam Cara, the national organisation that supports bereaved parents, is holding a Bereavement Information Evening on Tuesday 27th of September from 19:30 to 21:30 in the Westlodge Hotel, Bantry, Co. Cork. The guest speaker for the evening is Brid Carroll. This is a free event open to all bereaved parents. As Anam Cara will need to confirm numbers for this event, please RSVP to info@anamcara.ie before Monday 26th September or call the Information Line on 085 2888 888.

Some parent testimonies:

I have been to two information evenings. Both speakers were exceptionally good. I received very valuable nuggets of information and I got great comfort from speaking to the other parents afterwards.
This was my first time to attend the information evening. Meeting other parents, those who were further down this road, listening to them - it helped so much.

Take Care

Kind Regards,
Clodagh Curley
On Behalf of

Anam Cara Parental and Sibling Bereavement Support
HCL House,
Second Avenue,
Cookstown Industrial Estate,
Tallaght,
Dublin 24

Monday, 19 September 2016

Carrigaline proud of its Tidy Towns Heroes

The recent visit of RTE's Nationwide team to Carrigaline opened many local people eyes to the great work being done by their very committed Tidy Towns Committee. I recently visited Carrigaline to talk to some of the people involved and to hear first hand what is involved in being a member of a Tidy Towns committee in one of our larger towns here in County Cork.

As I sat down for a chat with Liam O'Connor, Maura Allen, Betty O'Riordan, Claire O'Mullane and Geraldine O'Hara the magnitude of their commitment soon became evident. Being involved with this tidy towns group demands complete dedication and loyalty to the other members of the group and it was obvious to me that a great bond existed between all the members of the team . The other  members of this committee include John Crowley who was a founder of the group away back in 1974 and who is  still very involved as treasurer as is Howard Crowley and long time member Barry Cogan. Howard and Barry are joint PRO's . David Collins (Collins Supervalu) is also part of the Committee.
This was not just a case of of a group arranging a few litter picks and watering some hanging baskets and flower beds. It was indeed a long term total commitment to their local community and it is definitely making Carrigaline a better place for all living and working there as well as those who visit the town.

Liam O'Connor who is the group's Chairman explained that while the committee meet formally every month to deal with the business on hand, 'we are in contact almost on a daily basis as we tackle issues as they arise'. 'We are in contact regularly also with Cork County Council who not only assist us greatly with financial support but they also provide advice and practical help on the ground'.  'We also got great help down the years from SECAD our local development company who provided advice and financial support with various projects we undertook in the town'  Liam told me.
 I was delighted to meet up again with Betty O Riordan another dedicated member of the team who explained that  the members of the committee undertake a walk around the town every January to find out what tasks need to done. 'We identify items that might need painting, planting or improving and these items are put on the list for the year'. ' 'In fact we have become multi skilled and experts in DIY painting weeding and planting and anything else that needs to be done' Betty said.
Betty explained 'Its full steam ahead then in March in preparation for the Tidy Town Judges visit which can be early in June,  'Its all hands on deck, and this demands total commitment from all our volunteers a few times a week to get the town ready and looking its best'  .
Maura Allen another very active member of the group said that 2016 had been a particularly busy year in that the committee had identified a lot of projects to improve the town.
'We were particularly worried about derelict buildings' Maura told me. 'On the main street we painted the old discount store and put in fake windows and we also painted a vacant building on Mill Lane'.  'Guard O'Neills House on Church Hill was also improved greatly with assistance from Carrigaline Men's Shed 'Maura said.


Other new items this year included a Hanging Basket project on the main street. 'The traders were great- they paid for the hanging baskets and we put them up and looked after them'  The committee also provided new street furniture on Main Street which included Tiered Planters, New Waste Bins and Cycle Racks. The Bridge was also greatly enhanced in conjunction with Cork County Council. A new 'Welcome Sign' was also erected.
I put it to the group that surely the committee cannot do all this work on its own?  'We could not operate without the full support of the community' Liam explained. 'We get great help from Residents groups, businesses, the Men's Shed group, all of the sporting organisations and a team of volunteers'.  'We are also very lucky to have such dedicated Tús and Community Employment Scheme Worker available to us'  We also get great help from both the Stonewall Garden Centre and The Pavilion Garden Centre as well as Dairygold. The committee also operate an 'Adopt a Road ' project in which various clubs and residents groups and Macra adopt an area and look after it. The local sports clubs are all very helpful including Rugby ,Soccer, Hurling and Football,Tennis as well as the Camogie club.
The committee have also developed some excellent projects around the Town and they are very grateful to those who have supported them financially Cork County Council SECAD local business, the general public and in particular their main sponsor Collins Supervalu.  They have been responsible for a series of Gardens including A Suibhneas (Peaceful) Garden, A Wildlife Garden, A Sail Garden and their latest 1916 Commemorative Garden.
They also have plans for a riverside Biodiversity Garden in the near future. They are also lucky to have very talented people in Carrigaline such as Peadar Drinan who has helped to design and produce some lovely sculpture to enhance the town. Another great project developed by Carrigaline Tidy Towns is the Heritage Trail which is a great addition to the town and continues to go from strength to strength. The Joe West Sculpture and the Owenabue River Plaza are now part of some beautiful streetscape.
The committee are also very keen to recognise and reward to efforts of individuals and businesses each year. To this end they organise an awards night each year to present awards such as the Best Business Award, The Best Estate Award, Best Private Garden and many other community awards.
Working with schools is a major part of the work of Carrigaline Tidy Towns.
Carrigaline Tidy Towns believe in passing on the mantle to the younger generation and are very keen to help the schoolchildren to  develope positive attitudes to the environment.
Maura told me that 'we very much appreciate the support of the teachers and staff of the schools for their continued support to Tidy Towns.'  Maura said the Tidy Towns has been involved with many projects with the schools both primary and secondary.
A great example of this was the 'We CAN help our World' Sculpture designed and constructed by the 4th year art students of Carrigaline Community School. The Sculpture of a tree made from almost 500 drink cans collected locally is a symbol of our beautiful environment and the benefits of recycling. The Tidy towns regularly visit the schools to highlight their work  and the schools help with litter picking and the planting of seasonal bedding and daffodil bulbs.
All the schools including the Gaelscoil, the Girls National School on Ballea Road as well as Scoil Mhuire BNS are helped with their Green Flag projects. The Tidy Towns and the schools also worked with Dr. Mary Stack Environmental Awareness Officer Cork County Council on projects such as Chewing Gum Awareness, stop food waste Day, Walk to school day. The Tidy Towns group also distributed apple trees and bulbs to all the schools. Transition year students also undertook a waste assessment survey with local industry.  The Work of the schools is also celebrated as part of the annual Tidy Towns Awards.
Carrigaline Tidy towns have to date won three Bronze and one silver medal in the Supervalu Tidy Towns Awards and we wish them well this year. They have also won many awards in the Muintir na Tire Pride in our Community Competition. Well done to all involved and keep up the great work.

Denis Kelly
Community Development Worker
Cork County Muintir na Tire






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Sean Murphy is overall Individual winner of The Mayor of the County of Cork Community Awards

Congratulations to Sean Murphy from Killeagh The overall Individual winner of  The Mayor of the County of Cork  Community Awards  ...